Stagflation, recession and the price of lettuce

It used to be that using the R word in a headline was tantamount to a self-fulfilling prophecy, so I added ‘lettuce’ to diminish the risk. Those inventive purveyors of ‘memes’ (visual satire), have been going on about the supposed price of lettuces in Australia – ‘tip of the iceberg’ and suchlike puns. I tend to invoke the Darryl Kerrigan mantra when confronted with over-priced food items (as much as $11). Darryl, from the Australian…

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Tiananmen Square and the China Dilemma

We released a new CD around the time of the 33rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, or as it is known by China’s government, ‘June Fourth Incident’. I mention this not as some outrageous plug for ‘merch’ but to draw your attention to the historic photo on the album cover. (Ed is now cringing slightly at the thought of plugging ‘merch’.) It shows Prime Minister Gough Whitlam meeting China’s then-president, Mao Tse Tung in…

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The global rise of Green politics

            From grass roots beginnings as an anti-war/anti-nuclear movement in the 1960s and 1970s, the Green party has grown to be a global force in politics. Our 2022 election clearly shows the rise of the Australian Greens, which traces its origins to Tasmania in 1972. From just one Federal member in 1992, the Greens now have 22 State MPs, 4 Federal MPs, up to 12 seats in the Senate and…

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Australia enters a brave new world

The reactions to Labor’s somewhat unexpected election win on Saturday night have reflected the about-turns that occur when the political climate changes. As always, there were positive opportunities for some. Sydney University wasted no time congratulating incoming PM Anthony Albanese, an alumni member. It should also be noted that former Prime Ministers who attended Sydney University included Gough Whitlam, John Howard and Malcolm Turnbull. So much for universities being the breeding ground of Marxists. Former…

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